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Should Students Have Homework Debate

  • I think kids should not have homework

    Kids need time you relax and unwind, if kids have to spend hours on homework then they are going to stay up late causing lack of sleep and making the brain not as capable to learn as usual. They should be able to hang out with friends. Kids need social time.

  • It is so much stress!!!!!!!

    I am a 9th grader and I rarely do homework, but I'm not being lazy. I spend my after school time doing other things like going for a walk, or sometimes doing something important, or sometimes I have a busy day, and sometimes I just need to relax! School often makes me tired and I have to rest a while before doing anything else! When I do my homework, I get frustrated because I have a lot of it. I have 8 classes each day and each class is 45 minutes long and I'm a little slower than others, so I often don't finish my class work in time, so it becomes homework. I also have problems with almost each subject: I get math homework every day and I have problems with doing it because it gets hard and I need help, but my sister and my mom are both dyslexic, making them have a hard time helping me, and my dad didn't learn what I'm learning when he was in 9th grade, so he doesn't know how to do it. If I have homework from my other classes, I have to write an essay or something (this homework is usually from classes like English and Geography) but I can't write something very long unless I'm really passionate about it. And most of all I can't concentrate!!! I recently couldn't finish a final draft of a project I was assigned where I had to write a letter to the ambassador (They weren't really letters to the ambassador, we were just learning how to write a letter to someone in authority) talking about some problem going on in different places in Africa and how we could help. I chose to write about how Nestle is draining South Africa and causing a lot of problems there and that we should put an end to it. But when I got started on it, I couldn't even finish the first paragraph because I couldn't concentrate, and like I said, I rarely do homework, because I usually spend my day doing something else and when I do, I get stressed out, so usually, even the thought of doing homework stresses me out, so I don't do it. I get math homework every day, so I can never get caught up enough, and I'm failing school because of it! My parents don't believe in ADHD medications and neither do I because we did our research and found out that they actually are really bad for you. So tell me, how in any way, is homework supposed to make my life better?! As far as I'm concerned, it makes everything worse!!

  • Homework Lowers Grades

    Homework is not healthy. You sit in a desk with bad posture all day, stay up till ten that night, and repeat the vicious cycle five more times, getting a brief two day break. After a while, this turns into stress because these children are only doing school related activities,which is very demoralizing and stressful. Some children do not have supportive parents and therefore poorly on their homework. In most schools, homework goes in as a grade. If children are too tired for excessive concentration, this will ultimately cause low homework scores. Especially for high school students, a positive grade in an adolescents record book will result in a higher chance of college acceptance. Homework should be banned.

  • Homework creates stress for the child

    Having more and more homework creates stress for the child and tires them out . Personally my child doesn't have a lot of time for homework so she's under a lot of stress to get it done correctly and on time . So I think children should not have a lot of homework . It's evil.

  • No, because we are too busy being active.

    Kids are too busy doing sports. I think that kids should not have homework. Kids need to be free. They need to not have homework over the summer or over the winter and over spring break they need to be just free. They have no right to make kids have homework!

  • Homework is usless

    I think children should not have homwork because it is usless everytime i get homwork in my class i dont do it becasue it does not help, even without homwork i get awesome grades homwork only helps if you need a lot of help. The only kind of homwork i do is the revision papers we get at the end of the chapters we do because that covers everything we did. A lot of the time you dont like homework because you dont like school so when you go home you are free from school but then you need to do homework... All it does is discourage you for the rest of the school year #NOHOMEWORK

  • Children should not get homework

    Children are at school for 6 to 7 hours and as soon as we get home we have to do more it is stupid. I think if teachers want children to have homework well why won't they just keep us in at lunch simple children go to school to learn and when we get home we want to relax and some children have no time for homework as they have chores when they get home

  • It's too stressful!!!!!!!!!

    Homework is completely and utterly stupid and I won't put up with it!!!! I think kids should have more after school time. When they do have the after school time to play with their friends and family, they can relieve themselves the stress of school because from my experience, school can be quite stressful.

  • Makes kids give up.

    Kids should not get homework because homework makes them not want to go to school and learn, it makes then give up and they don't get help. That's why I agree that kids should not get homework, because they get seven hours of school why get more hours to do homework?

  • Children should not have to do homework

    Children should not have to do homework because it causes stress to students and parents. Kids should be outside playing sport, keeping healthy and having a social life, not staying inside for 1-2 hours doing homework. Homework kills the bond between a kid and his/her parents. It wastes valuable time that youre going to want back when they're older. I believe that homework should be entirely banned or at least optional.

  • As kids return to school, debate is heating up once again over how they should spend their time after they leave the classroom for the day.

    The no-homework policy of a second-grade teacher in Texas went viral last week, earning praise from parents across the country who lament the heavy workload often assigned to young students. Brandy Young told parents she would not formally assign any homework this year, asking students instead to eat dinner with their families, play outside and go to bed early.

    But the question of how much work children should be doing outside of school remains controversial, and plenty of parents take issue with no-homework policies, worried their kids are losing a potential academic advantage. Here’s what you need to know:

    The issue

    For decades, the homework standard has been a “10-minute rule,” which recommends a daily maximum of 10 minutes of homework per grade level. Second graders, for example, should do about 20 minutes of homework each night. High school seniors should complete about two hours of homework each night. The National PTA and the National Education Association both support that guideline.

    But some schools have begun to give their youngest students a break. A Massachusetts elementary school has announced a no-homework pilot program for the coming school year, lengthening the school day by two hours to provide more in-class instruction. “We really want kids to go home at 4 o’clock, tired. We want their brain to be tired,” Kelly Elementary School Principal Jackie Glasheen said in an interview with a local TV station. “We want them to enjoy their families. We want them to go to soccer practice or football practice, and we want them to go to bed. And that’s it.”

    A New York City public elementary school implemented a similar policy last year, eliminating traditional homework assignments in favor of family time. The change was quickly met with outrage from some parents, though it earned support from other education leaders.

    New solutions and approaches to homework differ by community, and these local debates are complicated by the fact that even education experts disagree about what’s best for kids.

    The research

    The most comprehensive research on homework to date comes from a 2006 meta-analysis by Duke University psychology professor Harris Cooper, who found evidence of a positive correlation between homework and student achievement, meaning students who did homework performed better in school. The correlation was stronger for older students—in seventh through 12th grade—than for those in younger grades, for whom there was a weak relationship between homework and performance.

    Cooper’s analysis focused on how homework impacts academic achievement—test scores, for example. His report noted that homework is also thought to improve study habits, attitudes toward school, self-discipline, inquisitiveness and independent problem solving skills. On the other hand, some studies he examined showed that homework can cause physical and emotional fatigue, fuel negative attitudes about learning and limit leisure time for children. At the end of his analysis, Cooper recommended further study of such potential effects of homework.

    Despite the weak correlation between homework and performance for young children, Cooper argues that a small amount of homework is useful for all students. Second-graders should not be doing two hours of homework each night, he said, but they also shouldn’t be doing no homework.

    The debate

    Not all education experts agree entirely with Cooper’s assessment.

    Cathy Vatterott, an education professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, supports the “10-minute rule” as a maximum, but she thinks there is not sufficient proof that homework is helpful for students in elementary school.

    “Correlation is not causation,” she said. “Does homework cause achievement, or do high achievers do more homework?”

    Vatterott, the author of Rethinking Homework: Best Practices That Support Diverse Needs, thinks there should be more emphasis on improving the quality of homework tasks, and she supports efforts to eliminate homework for younger kids.

    “I have no concerns about students not starting homework until fourth grade or fifth grade,” she said, noting that while the debate over homework will undoubtedly continue, she has noticed a trend toward limiting, if not eliminating, homework in elementary school.

    The issue has been debated for decades. A TIME cover in 1999 read: “Too much homework! How it’s hurting our kids, and what parents should do about it.” The accompanying story noted that the launch of Sputnik in 1957 led to a push for better math and science education in the U.S. The ensuing pressure to be competitive on a global scale, plus the increasingly demanding college admissions process, fueled the practice of assigning homework.

    “The complaints are cyclical, and we’re in the part of the cycle now where the concern is for too much,” Cooper said. “You can go back to the 1970s, when you’ll find there were concerns that there was too little, when we were concerned about our global competitiveness.”

    Cooper acknowledged that some students really are bringing home too much homework, and their parents are right to be concerned.

    “A good way to think about homework is the way you think about medications or dietary supplements,” he said. “If you take too little, they’ll have no effect. If you take too much, they can kill you. If you take the right amount, you’ll get better.”