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Ecmt1010 Assignment Notebook

Subject Code: BUSS1020

Difficulty: 6/10

Time Spent per week: 8/10

Interest: 5/10


Review: A lot of people said 'this unit is so hard' and honestly after i finished it, it was not 'really hard'. I did not do mathematics and honestly i did really well in this course. The lecturers and tutorial teachers are really helpful. Just keep up to date with the content as it builds on the previous weeks. The weekly homework is great revision and an easy way to gain marks. The final exam is much much easier than any assessment throughout the course.

Subject Code: BUSS1002

Difficulty: 6/10

Time Spent per week: 4/10

Interest: 6/10


Review: This unit focusing on the external business environment is very interesting. I liked the 3 assignment tasks where surprisingly many people hated them - i thought they were easy/not that hard. However, the application of theory is where this unit was hard as it is not just spitting out the content, more so applying it to a fact situation i.e. article facts in an exam. Content wise it is easier - much less than 1001. I enjoyed this unit, just do notes for each reading.

Subject Code: BUSS1002

Difficulty: 6/10

Time Spent per week: 4/10

Interest: 6/10


Review: This unit focusing on the external business environment is very interesting. I liked the 3 assignment tasks where surprisingly many people hated them - i thought they were easy/not that hard. However, the application of theory is where this unit was hard as it is not just spitting out the content, more so applying it to a fact situation i.e. article facts in an exam. Content wise it is easier - much less than 1001. I enjoyed this unit, just do notes for each reading.

Subject Code: FINC3015

Difficulty: 7/10

Time Spent per week: 9/10

Interest: 10/10


Review: Awesome subject. Definitely recommend

Subject Code: FINC2011

Difficulty: 9/10

Time Spent per week: 8/10

Interest: 9/10


Review: definitely a hard subject. Dont do it if you just need to fill an elective. There are other subjects with much easier marks. This is a risky elective as many people fail finance.

Subject Code: ECOP1002

Difficulty: 2/10

Time Spent per week: 4/10

Interest: 3/10


Review: Nothing spectacular, just a simple course for ECOP kids to go through the motions, but essential for future progress nevertheless

Subject Code: ECOP1001

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 5/10

Interest: 5/10


Review: The whole subject is a general overview of the oh- so complex conflicting forms of economic thought. Political economy isn't that extraordinary. There is no direction in the unit other than a limited examination of classical political economy, marxism, keynesianism etc in a chronological sequence. It was very difficult for me to understand exactly what we were meant to analyse in assignments/ the exam.

Subject Code: ECOS2903

Difficulty: 8/10

Time Spent per week: 8/10

Interest: 4/10


Review: I feel alot more capable in mathematics having passed the unit, but it's hard to see its relevance to economics just yet. VERY HARD and a lot of people dropped out of economics honours stream because they couldn't keep up

Subject Code: ECOS1002

Difficulty: 1/10

Time Spent per week: 1/10

Interest: 5/10


Review: Its not a hard subject, somewhat interesting and the exams are straightforward.

Subject Code: ECOS1002

Difficulty: 4/10

Time Spent per week: 3/10

Interest: 9/10


Review: I hate economics and am only doing this to get my ground units for commerce out the way but by god I like this much MUCH more than micro! SO MUCH BETTER THAN BUSS1040!!!!

Subject Code: ECOS1001

Difficulty: 1/10

Time Spent per week: 2/10

Interest: 8/10


Review: I really enjoyed this subject. You can get through with just the lecture notes really.

Subject Code: CLAW2207

Difficulty: 1/10

Time Spent per week: 1/10

Interest: 5/10


Review: Good filler subject for CLAW major or people looking for easy electives to finish off their degree in the E+B Faculty.

Subject Code: CLAW2201

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 4/10

Interest: 8/10


Review: Good subject though most people wouldn?t care cos they would be doing it for CA/CPA req anyway.

Subject Code: CLAW1002

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 3/10

Interest: 7/10


Review: This subject deals primarily with property law. It has obvious practical real world relevance. A nice, solid subject that I would recommend to all.

Subject Code: CLAW1001

Difficulty: 2/10

Time Spent per week: 1/10

Interest: 6/10


Review: didnt go to any lectures, pretty easy, pretty interesting

Subject Code: CLAW1001

Difficulty: 4/10

Time Spent per week: 3/10

Interest: 8/10


Review: The research assessments are really good, with plenty of time and topics that have plenty to research. Some ppl (like me mates) found the amount of topics to understand were too many, especially when we only spent one lecture per topic. There's not much reading...but if you wanna do well read up on extra material as much as you can. The exam is long answer/essay type questions...That, in my opinion is much harder than the written assessment/tutorial work.

Subject Code: CLAW1001

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 5/10

Interest: 9/10


Review: a great subject which I would recommend anyone to take. It is relevant, interesting and very rewarding in the end. All in all, I would describe it as 'fun'.

Subject Code: BIOL3011

Difficulty: 2/10

Time Spent per week: 4/10

Interest: 9/10


Review: Great subject. People who hate group work need not apply, however. The exam was super easy as well

Subject Code: BIOL2012

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 6/10

Interest: 7/10


Review: I liked it quite a bit. Lots of learning opportunities, lots of fun to be had and only a couple of boring parts/lecturers. Of note is that it looks as if they've minimised the "walk around and copy crap off boards" method in this unit and instead have gone to lengths to make labs interesting. You'll be doing a dissection every other week in this course, which is always pretty fun. The amphibians lab was awesome

Subject Code: BIOL2011

Difficulty: 8/10

Time Spent per week: 7/10

Interest: 5/10


Review: Not that impressive. Boring subject material isn't aided by mediocre lecturers. Like vertebrates, it was very well organised and the labs were good but they aren't good enough to bring the score of this difficult and boring subject up too far. I don't reccomend it unless you really need it (do vertebrates though).

Subject Code: BIOL1001

Difficulty: 4/10

Time Spent per week: 4/10

Interest: 4/10


Review: Don't do it if you can. If you have to, the grit your teeth and get a pass. That was all I aimed for. Because it was just so not enjoyable. If you liked it, then good. But for me it was just bad, bad and more bad. I didn't bother going to lectures after week 6 because I found it was no use coz I didn't get the lecture anyway! And the text book is not much help, because you don't have a syllabus to show what is IN the EXAM. Felt like a headless fly when studying for the finals.

Subject Code: ARHT2642

Difficulty: 1/10

Time Spent per week: 1/10

Interest: 5/10


Review: This was a very unsatisfying unit, when it could have been so much more. Other than for one assessment there was no reason to buy or read the course reader, and really no incentive to attend lectures, which tended to be a slow parade of images with minimal explanation or history.

Subject Code: ANHS2068

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 5/10

Interest: 10/10


Review: I cannot recommend this course highly enough. It is probably the best Ancient History course on offer, to be honest (though I'm yet to take Pagans and Christians in the Roman World, which in my eyes is the only other candidate).

Subject Code: ANHS2601

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 1/10

Interest: 4/10


Review: This course is not terrible, but it is also nothing exciting. It's a good foundation but I expected more than that from a second year course. However, I'm glad I did it just for the extra knowledge of periods I had never studied.

Subject Code: ANHS1005

Difficulty: 2/10

Time Spent per week: 2/10

Interest: 8/10


Review: Really good course, strongly recommend it for ancient history buffs. Unfortunately they're changing around the junior ANHS courses next year, but I can't imagine that the new course will be that different.

Subject Code: ANHS1004

Difficulty: 4/10

Time Spent per week: 2/10

Interest: 6/10


Review: This was an average course, really. I found some of it quite interesting but I didn't pick it so much on its merits as a) fulfilling a junior credit point requirement and b) it covering a lot of the same content as the HSC course. This was significantly helped by lecturing, which I felt was the redeeming part of this course

Subject Code: ACCT3011

Difficulty: 4/10

Time Spent per week: 5/10

Interest: 5/10


Review: Like ACCT2011, if you study hard you won't likely fail. It's one of the subjects where if you study a lot you will do well. The essay was a bit tricky, though. The lecturers are really nice and approachable.

Subject Code: ACCT1002

Difficulty: 2/10

Time Spent per week: 4/10

Interest: 4/10


Review: I'm probably not the best person to rate this module but I personally think its easy if you have the fundamentals from 1A in place. Forgot to add, the coursework component was useless for marks. Everyone I know went into the final on 40+%. Check out the UOS for the coursework marks allocation there are way too much freebie marks.

Subject Code: ACCT1002

Difficulty: 1/10

Time Spent per week: 2/10

Interest: 8/10


Review: This subject is ten times easier than ACCT1001. The exam questions are just tute questions with different numbers. If you can do the tute questions you can do the exam questions.

Subject Code: ACCT1002

Difficulty: 2/10

Time Spent per week: 4/10

Interest: 7/10


Review: Overall, though, the unit wasn't that great, lots of boring things we had to learn (such as financial statement analysis) and the horrible lecturers we sometimes had to endure. I can certainly see the relevance to my career though (even though I'm in marketing). Management accounting (the second part) was sadly boring, but relevant for me. Financial accounting was more interesting, but not really relevant.

Subject Code: ACCT1001

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 2/10

Interest: 2/10


Review: rates as one of the most boring subjects ever. Lecturers are really good just the content is really really boring

Subject Code: ACCT1001

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 6/10

Interest: 3/10


Review: not hard if you just do homework regularly towards the end lectures are soooo slow and boring, stuffy theatre didn't help me stay awake. content was boring most times

Subject Code: ACCT1001

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 2/10

Interest: 8/10


Review: whoa. I can't believe I'm saying this, but I liked this subject. It was very different to all my other subjects (essay-based and subjective). It was kind of cool having a correct answer to every question. It was also good to think in a completely different manner, to what I was used to. Although, if I had to do accounting for more than 2 subjects, I'd probably die from boredom. A catch-22, if you must.

Subject Code: AERO2703

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 7/10

Interest: 7/10


Review: The assessment structure is debateable with the tutor seeming to make more on how you do it rather then if it is correct and you showed how you did it.

Subject Code: ECOS2902

Difficulty: 7/10

Time Spent per week: 9/10

Interest: 10/10


Review: Awesome subject but the lectures are a bit slow. Content is really engaging but DO NOT fall behind because every week builds on the work from the week beforehand! By the end of the course you are using a graph from week 1 but linking it to graphs/concepts from week 5, 10, 12, 13. Only assessment is a quiz and tutorial participation but quiz is extremely difficult so make sure you prepare.

Subject Code: ECOS2901

Difficulty: 8/10

Time Spent per week: 7/10

Interest: 10/10


Review: One of the best courses I have taken with one of the best lecturers at the uni. Two quizzes are very hard but if you keep on top of the content you can do well. Almost no-one will get full marks and you will see a lot of people drop out throughout. More in-depth than ECOS2001 so be prepared to have to critically deconstruct all your content. Final exam was quite tricky so you need to be really be on top of everything to do well

Subject Code: ECMT2110

Difficulty: 5/10

Time Spent per week: 8/10

Interest: 2/10


Review: Not a very interesting subject as the whole thing is just about regression and how you can make sure your regression model is accurate. Heaps of little assignments and quiz was deceptively hard! If you smash the quiz you can get scaled very well during the final exam, which is easy in comparison. Be wary not to fall behind because none of the formulas or statistical tests are given. You must memorise them all!

Subject Code: ECMT1020

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 3/10

Interest: 5/10


Review: Just your basic stats course but extended from the content you learn in ECMT1010/BUSS1020. Can be difficult if you fall behind and make sure you keep on top of the maths aspect if maths is not your strong suit. Content is all very straightforward and easy to learn. Assignments aren't too hard, quiz is easy and report is very very simple

Subject Code: FINC3017

Difficulty: 9/10

Time Spent per week: 9/10

Interest: 10/10


Review: Extremely difficult but very interesting subject! Very content heavy however none of that is really tested in the assignments or in the final exam. Final exam is largely based off journal articles you read throughout the course so be sure to know them in depth including the methods sections! Assignments can be done easily but take a fair bit of time! Make sure you know how to use excel and define your topic well in the essay. Lecturer is probably one of the best at USYD

Subject Code: FINC3011

Difficulty: 2/10

Time Spent per week: 2/10

Interest: 8/10


Review: Really interesting subject and very easy to do well in. The current assessment schedule is two quizzes, class participation, and a final exam. The quizzes are very easy if you have kept on top of the content (with a few trick questions thrown in). Class participation is just textbook q&a. Final exam was challenging, particularly the section on swaps and the other written parts. Awesome course overall!

Subject Code: FINC2012

Difficulty: 5/10

Time Spent per week: 3/10

Interest: 10/10


Review: Found corporate finance 2 extremely easy compared to corp 1, however this is not normally the case. The quiz was really straightforward. The assignment was hard but not overly so. Final exam was super straightforward and ended up dropping 5 marks of 120. Great subject overall but don't fall behind because all the options topics in the middle work through other areas!

Subject Code: FINC2011

Difficulty: 8/10

Time Spent per week: 8/10

Interest: 8/10


Review: A very interesting but challenging course. Really enjoyed my first course in finance however it was hard getting my head around everything for the first time so spent additional time studying. Assignment was challenging but luckily FINSOC ran a workshop which helped! Final exam was straightforward. Quiz was insanely hard so be prepared! Overall a good subject

Subject Code: BUSS1040

Difficulty: 5/10

Time Spent per week: 3/10

Interest: 7/10


Review: Being a core commerce unit, it starts of with introductory economic knowledge. However, the difficulty of the course picks up quickly making it hard to keep up if you haven't studied HSC economics. Weekly tutorials are non-compulsory. Overall, workload for the subject is quite low.

Subject Code: BUSS1020

Difficulty: 7/10

Time Spent per week: 4/10

Interest: 6/10


Review: Being a core commerce unit, it starts of with introductory statistical knowledge. However, the difficulty of the course picks up quickly making it hard to catch up if you fall behind. The hints option in the weekly online statslab is extremely helpful in developing these concepts. I would highly recommend clarifying and misconceptions as most of the harder concepts are based on earlier ideas.

Subject Code: FINC2011

Difficulty: 7/10

Time Spent per week: 7/10

Interest: 9/10


Review: As a finance major, I was quite interested in the introductory concepts of Corporate Finance I. Tutorial homework is extremely helpful in keeping up with new concepts and tutors are knowledgeable about the content. Overall, a well taught and interesting course with plenty of materials available. Be sure to get your hands on practice questions from previous years to practice for the mid-sems and finals.

Subject Code: ECON1002

Difficulty: 6/10

Time Spent per week: 2/10

Interest: 10/10


Review: ECON1002 is essentially an extension of HSC Economics. Here, the extension comes from the addition of mathematics in the content and the introduction of mathematical, but basic, models. I did this in my first semester of university (Sem 1, 2013) and found it quite easy to transition into. The content is definitely interesting and it requires minimal effort. I attended the first two lectures and they were basically the lecturer reading off the lecture slides. It is a very textbook study type unit

Subject Code: BUSS1040

Difficulty: 5/10

Time Spent per week: 5/10

Interest: 6/10


Review: The lecturers were excellent, as the lecturers explained concepts mathematically or used real-life examples instead of a wordy chunk in the textbook. Exams were based on tutorial questions, which are important to complete and mark in tutorials because they not only check that you've understood lectured content, but also build on that a little. Another course where keeping up is important because nearly each week's content is next week's foundation.

Subject Code: BUSS1030

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 6/10

Interest: 9/10


Review: As an Accounting major, I was pretty interested in BUSS1030 as it taught me the basics. It's not particularly hard - just think logically and try not to over-complicate figures. Homework is weekly and often checked and, along with tutorial participation, can get you easy marks. Homework also helps with consolidating knowledge for exams, as do extra textbook questions.

Subject Code: BUSS1020

Difficulty: 6/10

Time Spent per week: 8/10

Interest: 5/10


Review: Although an "introductory" statistics course, BUSS1020 is quite maths-based so you must keep up with every week's content, as it moves quite quickly and if you lose track, it'll become an endless cycle as most weeks' content build upon previous weeks'. Do many practice questions (although time-consuming) to gain easy homework marks and be better prepared for the quizzes and final exam. Go to the workshops to understand how to use Excel for statistics (helpful for assignment).

Subject Code: BUSS1002

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 7/10

Interest: 6/10


Review: BUSS1002 focuses on the external environment so one must be up-to-date with current affairs. Since real-life case studies are used, I was relatively interested in the course, and the concepts were mostly easy to understand (often reliant on common knowledge). Make sure to spend adequate time finding appropriate articles for assignments and carrying out research. Keep up with readings which cover the necessary concepts and know a few key concepts especially well for the final exam.

Subject Code: BUSS1001

Difficulty: 4/10

Time Spent per week: 7/10

Interest: 3/10


Review: As a core subject, BUSS1001 covers many key concepts concerning business management but at the same time, it is delivered in a fairly unengaging textbook manner in lectures. While there is not much in terms of weekly homework, a decent amount of time must be spent doing readings and when it comes to assignment deadlines, there is quite a flurry among the cohort to do all the research and accurate referencing required in the writing. Take particular note of how to write in ACAR style.

Subject Code: MATH1001

Difficulty: 8/10

Time Spent per week: 10/10

Interest: 4/10


Review: Similar to all maths subjects at USYD you need to spend a lot of time reviewing content and doing questions if you want to do well. The assignment schedule sucks because you have a lot of assignments but then a massive final exam and so each assignment is worth about 5% even though it may take 3-5 hours to complete. need to keep on top of content from day 1 because with 3 lectures a week it gets hard quick if you fall behind

Subject Code: BUSS1040

Difficulty: 8/10

Time Spent per week: 8/10

Interest: 7/10


Review: Economics is always one of the most interesting yet hardest subjects taught in first year. the style of teaching the business school uses for this is hard for a lot of people to understand. Also, the assignment is normally very painful for everyone and so make sure you do well. You have to do the readings to keep on top of everything otherwise at week 5/6 you will fall behind rapidly. Make sure you do well in the quizzes throughout the semester. Final exam is straightforward

Subject Code: BUSS1030

Difficulty: 8/10

Time Spent per week: 5/10

Interest: 5/10


Review: Its accounting so its not that interesting thats for sure. The midsem is notoriously hard so if you want your overall grade to scale well, make sure you put the effort in to crush the mid semester exam. Content isn't that challenging but make sure you don't fall behind because each week is linked to the next in some way. Final exam is normally quite straightforward. My accounting lab will forever be the worst learning tool you use at university so just struggle through this one semester

Subject Code: BUSS1001

Difficulty: 6/10

Time Spent per week: 6/10

Interest: 6/10


Review: Not a hard course but it is quite time consuming purely because of the assignment structure used. Content is easy but make sure you have mastered the ACAR style of writing before the final exam because that is what they ask for. My tip would be to keep a checklist of concepts and definitions you learn and review those weekly because you can be tested on any concept you learn in the final.

Subject Code: FINC3021

Difficulty: 9/10

Time Spent per week: 8/10

Interest: 8/10


Review: A very mathematical course. Require a high level of math skills, you need to have done 4U math for HSC to be able to keep up the pace. This is probably the most technical and difficult course among all financial units.

Subject Code: MATH1001

Difficulty: 4/10

Time Spent per week: 8/10

Interest: 6/10


Review: while a very easy course, it is easy to fall behind as the quizzes and assignments require a lot of time to prepare for. there are 3 lectures a week and if you miss one you have to catch up straight away otherwise it compounds really quickly. lecturers are brilliant though but tutorials were largely useless as they didn't go through solutions, rather just provided you with a quiet place to sit for an hour. the mark you get is very much reflective of the effort you put in

Subject Code: BUSS1040

Difficulty: 9/10

Time Spent per week: 7/10

Interest: 9/10


Review: a very interesting but difficult course. it is extremely easy to fall behind and once you do it is hard to catch up as the course moves very quickly. assignment and midsems are both hard unless you have a really good understanding of the topic. make sure you do a lot of reading and understand each concept in depth as it is hard to pass the course without a very thorough understanding of all the content. lecturer was good and made good slides which exam/assignment were based off

Subject Code: BUSS1030

Difficulty: 8/10

Time Spent per week: 7/10

Interest: 4/10


Review: A good course but it takes a while to understand. midsem is where most people fall down so if you do well you can really boost your final grade. content is easy to understand but it does take a lot of time to do examples to reinforce this understanding and make sure you can actually complete the questions. lecturers are brilliant but tutorials are generally horrible. if you keep on top of practice questions, you'll be fine as its basically addition/subtraction with a few conceptual questions

Subject Code: BUSS1020

Difficulty: 6/10

Time Spent per week: 5/10

Interest: 8/10


Review: BUSS1020 is a basic introduction to statistics course and is very easy to do well in as long as you practice your tutorial questions every week. you need to keep on top of the maths, but none of it is hard. its really interesting however a lot of people get confused but the tutors are really helpful and understand it takes a while to understand what is happening. assignments and quizzes were fine, just need to practice questions and understand the concept and process to answer questions before

Subject Code: BUSS1002

Difficulty: 3/10

Time Spent per week: 7/10

Interest: 6/10


Review: I found it a lot better than BUSS1001 in terms of content, however BUSS1002 is still your basic introductory course and so is not too difficult. as long as you keep on top of readings and the assignments you will be fine. they kill you if you do references wrong and don't submit late as there are brutal penalties for both! the final exam was deceptively easy, just make sure you utilise the ACAR format for your responses and have a few key concepts tucked away to talk about. overall pretty good

Subject Code: BUSS1001

Difficulty: 4/10

Time Spent per week: 7/10

Interest: 4/10


Review: While it is not a particularly interesting course BUSS1001 does have a lot of interesting introductory business concepts. the tri-weekly assignments get annoying and required a fair bit of time. make sure you are precise with references, as they are very particular about them. content isn't hard and lectures are easy to follow. as long as you do the readings and keep track of key concepts course is easy to do well in

Subject Code: ECOS2002

Difficulty: 7/10

Time Spent per week: 7/10

Interest: 4/10


Review: Wasn't as what I expected. It is really different from basic macroeconomics. Attend all tutorials and do practice questions. Make sure to do the practice paper under timed conditions especially the MCQs.

Subject Code: FINC2011

Difficulty: 7/10

Time Spent per week: 6/10

Interest: 8/10


Review: Interesting course, attend all lectures, ensure that you do practise the tutorial questions every week. Tip for finals, do the practice exam paper as the probability of finals being similar to practice is very high (as with sem 1 2014)!!!

Subject Code: ECON1002

Difficulty: 6/10

Time Spent per week: 5/10

Interest: 9/10


Review: Course was a brilliant intro course in macroeconomics. Course content wasn't too hard and was much easier to understand than similar courses such as BUSS1040. Assessments were straight forward, just an exam and an assignment, which didn't require anything bar normal study. lecturer was good too

Subject Code: ECON1002

Difficulty: 6/10

Time Spent per week: 5/10

Interest: 9/10


Review: Introductory macroeconomics was a brilliant course. It is a lot better than ECON1001 or BUSS1040 as it really allows you to explore and develop your understanding of economics. The assessment schedule isn't too packed as well with only a midsem and an assignment. Lecturer made this course fantastic.

Intermediate Mathematics and Statistics Handbook

Units of Study

Each unit of study has a web page, accessed by following the links on the main Intermediate Mathematics and Statistics web page.

In this chapter, Mathematics units are listed, by semester, in numerical order; then Statistics and Data Science units are listed, by semester, in numerical order.

Units are designated Mainstream or Advanced. Entry to an Advanced level unit normally requires a Credit or better in a Mainstream level prerequisite, or a Pass or better in an Advanced level prerequisite.

Mathematics units are also labelled Applied, or Pure, or both. Although there is no clear distinction between applied mathematics and pure mathematics at the intermediate level, this labelling gives a rough guide as to which senior level units the intermediate level units are most closely allied with.

The unit code for an intermediate unit of study in the School consists of MATH or STAT or DATA followed by four digits: for example MATH2068 or STAT2011. The first digit is 1 for junior level units, 2 for intermediate level units, 3 for senior level units. The second digit indicates whether the unit is mainstream (0 or 1) or advanced (9). In most cases two units which share the same last two digits are mutually exclusive: for example, MATH2061 may not be counted with MATH2961. The one exception is that MATH2068 and MATH2968 are not mutually exclusive. Instead MATH2068 and MATH2988 are mutually exclusive.

Text and reference books are yet to be advised. Except for The Little Blue Book it is suggested that you do not purchase any books until recommendations are made by lecturers.

The Little Blue Book is a compact reference book: it contains definitions, formulas and important results from Junior Mathematics which are used in Intermediate Units. It is recommended that all students have access to this book: it is available from the Coop Bookshop.

Semester 1

Semester 2

Mathematics – Semester 1 Units


MATH2021 Vector Calculus and Differential Equations

(6 credit points, Mainstream, Pure and Applied)

Prerequisites: MATH1021 or MATH1921 or MATH1931 or MATH1001 or MATH1901 or MATH1906,
and MATH1002 or MATH1902 or MATH1022 or MATH1922,
and MATH1023 or MATH1923 or MATH1933 or MATH1003 or MATH1903 or MATH1907.

Prohibitions: May not be counted with MATH2921 or MATH2065 or MATH2965 or MATH2061 or MATH2961 or MATH2067

Lecturer(s): Daniel Hauer.

Classes: 3 lectures, 1 tutorial and 1 practice class per week.

Assessment: One 2 hr exam, assignments, quizzes.

This unit opens with topics from vector calculus, including vector-valued functions (parametrized curves and surfaces; vector fields; div, grad and curl; gradient fields and potential functions), line integrals (arc length; work; path-independent integrals and conservative fields; flux across a curve), iterated integrals (double and triple integrals, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; areas, volumes and mass; Green's Theorem), flux integrals (flow through a surface; flux integrals through a surface defined by a function of two variables, through cylinders, spheres and other parametrized surfaces), Gauss' and Stokes' theorems.

The unit then moves to topics in solution techniques for ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications. It provides a basic grounding in these techniques to enable students to build on the concepts in their subsequent courses. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series).

MATH2022 Linear and Abstract Algebra

(6 credit points, Mainstream, Pure and Applied)

Prerequisites: MATH1002 or MATH1022 or MATH1902 or MATH1922.

Prohibitions: May not be counted with MATH2922 or MATH2968 or MATH2061 or MATH2961.

Lecturer(s): David Easdown.

Classes: 3 lectures, 1 tutorial and 1 practice class per week.

Assessment: One 2 hr exam, assignments, quizzes.

Linear and abstract algebra form one of the cornerstones of mathematics and is at the heart of many applications of mathematics and statistics in the sciences and engineering. This unit investigates and explores properties of linear functions, developing general principles relating to the solution sets of homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear equations, including differential equations. Linear independence is introduced as a way of understanding and solving linear systems of arbitrary dimension. Linear operators on real spaces are investigated, paying particular attention to the geometrical significance of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, extending ideas from first year linear algebra. To better understand symmetry, matrix and permutation groups are introduced and used to motivate the study of abstract group theory.

MATH2061 Linear Mathematics and Vector Calculus

(6 credit points, Mainstream, Pure and Applied)

Prerequisites: One of MATH1011 or MATH1001 or MATH1901 or MATH1906, and one of MATH1014 or MATH1002 or MATH1902, and one of MATH1003 or MATH1903 or MATH1907.

Prohibitions: May not be counted with MATH2067 or MATH2961

Lecturer(s): Laurentiu Paunescu and Brad Roberts (Linear Mathematics), David Ivers and Fernando Viera (Vector Calculus).

Classes: 3 lectures, 1 tutorial and 1 practice class per week.

Assessment: One 2 hr exam, assignments, quizzes.

This unit starts with an investigation of linearity: linear functions, general principles relating to the solution sets of homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear equations (including differential equations), linear independence and the dimension of a linear space. The study of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, begun in junior level linear algebra, is extended and developed. Linear operators on two dimensional real space are investigated, paying particular attention to the geometrical significance of eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

The unit then moves on to topics from vector calculus, including vector-valued functions (parametrised curves and surfaces; vector fields; div, grad and curl; gradient fields and potential functions), line integrals (arc length; work; pathindependent integrals and conservative fields; flux across a curve), iterated integrals (double and triple integrals; polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; areas, volumes and mass; Green's Theorem), flux integrals (flow through a surface; flux integrals through a surface defined by a function of two variables, though cylinders, spheres and parametrised surfaces), Gauss' Divergence Theorem and Stokes' Theorem.

MATH2069/2969 Discrete Mathematics and Graph Theory

(6 credit points, Mainstream/Advanced, Pure)

Prerequisites (MATH2069): 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics.

Prerequisites (MATH2969): 9 credit points of Junior Mathematics at the advanced level or at the mainstream level with credit.

Prohibitions: MATH2069 and MATH2969 may not both be counted.

Lecturer(s): Alexander Molev .

Classes: 3 lectures, 1 tutorial and 1 practice class per week.

Assessment: One 2 hr exam, assignments, quizzes.

We introduce students to several related areas of discrete mathematics, which serve their interests for further study in pure and applied mathematics, computer science and engineering. Topics to be covered in the first part of the unit include recursion and induction, generating functions and recurrences, combinatorics, asymptotics and analysis of algorithms. Topics covered in the second part of the unit include Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs, the theory of trees (used in the study of data structures), planar graphs, the study of chromatic polynomials (important in scheduling problems), maximal flows in networks, matching theory.

MATH2921 Vector Calculus and Differential Equations (advanced)

(6 credit points, Advanced, Pure and Applied)

Prerequisites: MATH1921 or MATH1931 or MATH1001 or MATH1901 or MATH1906 or a mark of 65 or above in MATH1001 or MATH1021,
and MATH1902 or a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002,
and MATH1923 or MATH1933 or MATH1903 or MATH1907 or a mark of 65 or above in MATH1003 or MATH1023.

Prohibitions: May not be counted with MATH2021 or MATH2065 or MATH2965 or MATH2061 or MATH2961 or MATH2067

Classes: 3 lectures and 1 tutorial and 1 practice class per week.

Assessment: quizzes, assignments and a final exam.

This is the advanced version of MATH2021, with more emphasis on the underlying concepts and mathematical rigour. The vector calculus component of the course will include: parametrised curves and surfaces, vector fields, div, grad and curl, gradient fields and potential functions, lagrange multipliers line integrals, arc length, work, path-independent integrals, and conservative fields, flux across a curve, double and triple integrals, change of variable formulas, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, areas, volumes and mass, flux integrals, and Green's Gauss' and Stokes' theorems. The Differential Equations half of the course will focus on ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications with more complexity and depth. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), series solutions near a regular point, higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, matrix equations and solutions, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, elementary Sturm-Liouville theory, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series).

The unit then moves to topics in solution techniques for ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications. It provides a more thorough grounding in these techniques to enable students to build on the concepts in their subsequent courses. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series).

MATH2922 Linear and Abstract Algebra (advanced)

(6 credit points, Advanced, Pure and Applied)

Prerequisites: MATH1902 or a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002.

Prohibitions: May not be counted with MATH2022 or MATH2968 or MATH2061 or MATH2961.

Classes: 3 lectures and 1 tutorial and 1 practice class per week.

Assessment: quizzes, assignments and a final exam.

Linear and abstract algebra form one of the cornerstones of mathematics and is at the heart of many applications of mathematics and statistics in the sciences and engineering. This unit is an advanced version of MATH2022, with more emphasis on the underlying concepts and on mathematical rigour. This unit investigates and explores properties of vector spaces, matrices and linear transformations, developing general principles relating to the solution sets of homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear equations, including differential equations. Linear independence is introduced as a way of understanding and solving linear systems of arbitrary dimension. Linear operators on real spaces are investigated, paying particular attention to the geometrical significance of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, extending ideas from first year linear algebra. To better understand symmetry, matrix and permutation groups are introduced and used to motivate the study of abstract group theory. The unit culminates in studying inner spaces, quadratic forms and normal forms of matrices together with their applications to problems both in mathematics and in the sciences and engineering.

MATH2916 Working Seminar A (SSP)

(3 credit points, Advanced, Pure and Applied)

Prerequisites: By invitation, High Distinction average over 12 credit points of Advanced Junior Mathematics.

Lecturer(s): Emma Carberry .

Classes: 1 one-hour seminar per week.

Assessment: A one-hour presentation and a 15 to 20 page essay.

The main aim of this unit is to develop the students' written and oral presentation skills. The material will consist of a series of connected topics relevant to modern mathematics and statistics. The topics are chosen to suit the students' background and interests, and are not covered by other mathematics or statistics units. The first session will be an introduction on the principles of written and oral presentation of mathematics. Under the supervision and advice of the lecturer(s) in charge, the students present the topics to the other students and the lecturer in a seminar series and a written essay in a manner that reflects the practice of research in mathematics and statistics.

Mathematics – Semester 2 Units


MATH2023 Analysis

(6 credit points, Mainstream, Pure and Applied)

Prerequisites: MATH1021 or or MATH1921 or MATH1931 or MATH1001 or MATH1901 or MATH1906,
and MATH1023 or or MATH1923 or MATH1933 or MATH1003 or MATH1903 or MATH1907,
and MATH1002 or MATH1902.

Prohibitions: May not both be counted with MATH2923 or MATH3068 or MATH2962.

Lecturer(s): Milena Radnovic.

Classes: 3 lectures, 1 tutorial and 1 practice class per week.

Assessment: One 2 hr exam (70%), mid-semester test (20%), assignments (10%).

Analysis grew out of calculus, which leads to the study of limits of functions, sequences and series. It is one of the fundamental topics underlying much of mathematics including differential equations, dynamical systems, differential geometry, topology and Fourier analysis. This unit introduces the field of mathematical analysis both with a careful theoretical framework as well as selected applications. It shows the utility of abstract concepts and teaches an understanding and construction of proofs in mathematics. This unit will be useful to students of mathematics, science and engineering and in particular to future school mathematics teachers, because we shall explain why common practices in the use of calculus are correct, and understanding this is important for correct applications and explanations. The unit starts with the foundations of calculus and the real numbers system. It goes on to study the limiting behaviour of sequences and series of real and complex numbers. This leads naturally to the study of functions defined as limits and to the notion of uniform convergence. Returning to the beginnings of calculus and power series expansions leads to complex variable theory: elementary functions of complex variable, the Cauchy integral theorem, Cauchy integral formula, residues and related topics with applications to real integrals.

MATH2068/2988 Number Theory and Cryptography

(6 credit points, Mainstream/Avanced, Pure)

Prerequisites (MATH2068): 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics.

Prerequisites (MATH2988): 9 credit points of Junior Mathematics at the advanced level or at the mainstream level with credit.

Lecturer(s): Dzmitry Badziahin .

Classes: 3 lectures, 1 tutorial and 1 computer lab per week.

Assessment: One 2 hour exam (70%), quiz (10%), assignments (20%).

Cryptography is the branch of mathematics that provides the techniques for confidential exchange of information sent via possibly insecure channels. This unit introduces the tools from elementary number theory that are needed to understand the mathematics underlying the most commonly used modern public key cryptosystems. Topics include the Euclidean Algorithm, Fermat's Little Theorem, the Chinese Remainder Theorem, Möbius Inversion, the RSA Cryptosystem, the Elgamal Cryptosystem and the Diffie-Hellman Protocol. Issues of computational complexity are also discussed.

MATH2070/2970 Optimisation and Financial Mathematics

(6 credit points, Mainstream/Avanced, Applied)

Prerequisites (MATH2070): MATH1011 or MATH1001 or MATH1901 or MATH1906, and MATH1014 or MATH1002 or MATH1902.

Prerequisites (MATH2970): MATH1901 or MATH1906 or credit in MATH1001, and MATH1902 or credit MATH1002.

Assumed knowledge: MATH1003 for MATH2070, MATH1903 (or MATH1907 or Credit in MATH1003) for MATH2970.

Lecturer(s): Anna Aksamit and Georg Gottwald .

Classes: 3 lectures, 1 tutorial and 1 computer lab per week.

Assessment: One 2 hour exam (70%), assignments (10%), quizzes (10%), project (10%).

Problems in industry and commerce often involve maximising profits or minimising costs subject to constraints arising from resource limitations. The first part of this unit looks at the important class of linear programming problems and their solution using the simplex algorithm, and the minimisation of functions of several variables with constraints, including Lagrange multipliers, Kuhn-Tucker theory and quadratic programming.

The second part of the unit deals with utility theory and modern portfolio theory. Topics covered include: pricing under the principles of expected return and expected utility; mean-variance Markowitz portfolio theory, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, log-optimal portfolios and the Kelly criterion; dynamical programming. Some understanding of probability theory including distributions and expectations is required in this part. Theory developed in lectures will be complemented by computer laboratory sessions using MATLAB. Minimal computing experience will be required.

Analysis

(6 credit points, Advanced, Applied)

Prerequisite: MATH1921 or MATH1931 or MATH1901 or MATH1906 or a mark of 65 or above in MATH1021 or MATH1001,
and MATH1902 or a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002,
and MATH1923 or MATH1933 or MATH1903 or MATH1907 or a mark of 65 or above in MATH1023 or MATH1003.

Lecturer(s): Florica Cîrstea.

Classes: 3 lectures, 1 tutorial and 1 practice class per week.

Assessment: quizzes, an assignment, and a final exam .

Analysis grew out of calculus, which leads to the study of limits of functions, sequences and series. It is one of the fundamental topics underlying much of mathematics including differential equations, dynamical systems, differential geometry, topology and Fourier analysis. This advanced unit introduces the field of mathematical analysis both with a careful theoretical framework as well as selected applications. It shows the utility of abstract concepts and teaches an understanding and construction of proofs in mathematics. This unit will be useful to students with more mathematical maturity who study mathematics, science, or engineering. The unit starts with the foundations of calculus and the system of real numbers, with more emphasis on the topology. It goes on to study the limiting behaviour of sequences and series of real and complex numbers. This leads naturally to the study of functions defined as limits and to the notion of uniform convergence. Returning to the beginnings of calculus and power series expansions leads to complex variable theory: elementary functions of complex variable, the Cauchy integral theorem, Cauchy integral formula, residues and related topics with applications to real integrals.

MATH2917 Working Seminar B (SSP)

(3 credit points, Advanced, Pure and Applied)

Prerequisites: By invitation, High Distinction average over 12 credit points of Advanced Junior Mathematics.

Lecturer(s): Peter Kim .

Classes: 1 one-hour seminar per week.

Assessment: A one-hour presentation and a 15 to 20 page essay.

The main aim of this unit is to develop the students' written and oral presentation skills. The material will consist of a series of connected topics relevant to modern mathematics and statistics. The topics are chosen to suit the students' background and interests, and are not covered by other mathematics or statistics units. The first session will be an introduction on the principles of written and oral presentation of mathematics. Under the supervision and advice of the lecturer(s) in charge, the students present the topics to the other students and the lecturer in a seminar series and a written essay in a manner that reflects the practice of research in mathematics and statistics.

Statistics and Data Science Units


STAT2011 Statistical Models

(6 credit points, Mainstream)

Prerequisites: MATH1001 or MATH1011 or MATH1901 or MATH1906, and MATH1005 or MATH1015 or STAT1021 or MATH1905 or ECMT1010.

Prohibition: May not be counted with STAT2911.

Lecturer(s): Shelton Peiris and Samuel Müller .

Classes: 3 lectures, 1 tutorial and 1 computer lab per week.

Assessment: One 2 hour exam, assignments, quizzes, computer practical reports, and a one-hour computer practical class assessment task.

This unit provides an introduction to univariate techniques in data analysis and the most common statistical distributions that are used to model patterns of variability. Common discrete random variable models, like the binomial, Poisson and geometric, and continuous models, including the normal and exponential, will be studied. The method of moments and maximum likelihood techniques for fitting statistical distributions to data will be explored. The unit will have weekly computer classes where candidates will learn to use a statistical computing package to perform simulations and carry out computer intensive estimation techniques like the bootstrap method.

STAT2911 Probability and Statistical Models

(6 credit points, Advanced)

Prerequisites: MATH1903 or MATH1907 or credit in MATH1003, and and MATH1905 or credit in MATH1005 or MATH1015 or ECMT1010.

Prohibition: May not be counted with STAT2011.

Lecturer(s): Uri Keich .

Classes: 3 lectures, 1 tutorial and 1 computer lab per week.

Assessment: One 2 hour exam, assignments, quizzes, computer practical reports, and a one-hour computer practical class assessment task.

This unit is essentially an advanced version of STAT2011 with an emphasis on the mathematical techniques used to manipulate random variables and probability models. Common random variables including the Poisson, normal, beta and gamma families are introduced. Probability generating functions and convolution methods are used to understand the behaviour of sums of random variables. The method of moments and maximum likelihood techniques for fitting statistical distributions to data will be explored. The unit will have weekly computer classes where students will learn to use a statistical computing package to perform simulations and carry out computer intensive estimation techniques like the bootstrap method.

DATA2001 Data Science: Big Data and Data Diversity

(6 credit points)

Prerequisites: DATA1002 or INFO1110 or INFO1903 or INFO1103.

Lecturer(s): TBA.

Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work — own time.

Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%).

This unit focuses on methods and techniques to efficiently explore and analyse large data collections. Where are hot spots of pedestrian accidents across a city? What are the most popular travel locations according to user postings on a travel website? The ability to combine and analyse data from various sources and from databases is essential for informed decision making in both research and industry. Students will learn how to ingest, combine and summarize data from a variety of data models which are typically encountered in data science projects, such as relational, semi-structured, time series, geospatial, image, text. As well as reinforcing their programming skills through experience with relevant Python libraries, this course will also introduce students to the concept of declarative data processing with SQL, and to analyse data in relational databases. Students will be given data sets from, for example, social media, transport, health and social sciences, and be taught basic explorative data analysis and mining techniques in the context of small use cases. The unit will further give students an understanding of the challenges involved with analysing large data volumes, such as the idea to partition and distribute data and computation among multiple computers for processing of 'Big Data'.

Assessment: One 2 hour exam, assignments, quizzes, computer practical reports, and a one-hour computer practical class assessment task.

STAT2912 Statistical Tests (Advanced)

(6 credit points, Advanced)

Prerequisites: MATH1905 or credit in MATH1005 or MATH1015 or ECMT1010.

Prohibition: May not be counted with STAT2012.

Lecturer(s): TBA.

Classes: 3 lectures, 1 tutorial and 1 computer lab per week.

Assessment: One 2 hour exam (65%), assignments (10%), quizzes (5%), computer practical reports (10%), and a one-hour computer practical class assessment task (10%).

The unit provides an introduction to the standard methods of statistical analysis of data: tests of hypotheses and confidence intervals, including t-tests, analysis of variance, regression least squares and robust methods, power of tests, nonparametric tests, nonparametric smoothing, tests for count data goodness of fit, contingency tables. Graphical methods and diagnostics are used throughout with all analyses discussed in the context of computation with real data using an interactive statistical package.

There is emphasis both on the methods and their mathematical derivations.

DATA2002 Data Analytics: Learning from Data

(6 credit points)

Assumed knowledge: basic linear algebra and some coding, or QBUS1040.

Prohibitions: STAT2012 or STAT2912.

Lecturer(s): TBA.

Classes: 3 lectures and 2 computer tutorials per week.

Assessment: written assignment, presentation, exams.

Technological advances in science, business, engineering has given rise to a proliferation of data from all aspects of our life. Understanding the information presented in these data is critical as it enables informed decision making into many areas including market intelligence and science. DATA2002 is an intermediate level unit in statistics and data sciences, focusing on learning data analytic skills for a wide range of problems and data. How should the Australian government measure and report employment and unemployment? Can we tell the difference between decaffeinated and regular coffee ? In this course, you will learn how to ingest, combine and summarize data from a variety of data models which are typically encountered in data science projects as well as reinforcing their programming skills through experience with statistical programming language. You will also be exposed to the concept of statistical machine learning and develop the skill to analyse various types of data in order to answer a scientific question. From this unit, you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to embrace data analytic challenges stemming from everyday problems.